Bellevue Watershed Management Plan

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Bellevue’s streams, lakes and wetlands breathe life into our city – offering space for us to connect, learn and appreciate our natural surroundings. Bellevue has more than 80 miles of streams that are home to salmon and many other types of fish and wildlife.

As our city grows, we need to act to protect our waterways. The City of Bellevue is developing a 20-year Watershed Management Plan to improve the health of our streams for people and wildlife.

We need your input to develop an effective plan. You can get involved and help make an impact on our stream health in a few ways:



Learn more about the project on the "About the Project" tab below



Take our short survey in the "Survey" tab below by September 30



Sign up for email updates to learn about upcoming engagement opportunities


Bellevue’s streams, lakes and wetlands breathe life into our city – offering space for us to connect, learn and appreciate our natural surroundings. Bellevue has more than 80 miles of streams that are home to salmon and many other types of fish and wildlife.

As our city grows, we need to act to protect our waterways. The City of Bellevue is developing a 20-year Watershed Management Plan to improve the health of our streams for people and wildlife.

We need your input to develop an effective plan. You can get involved and help make an impact on our stream health in a few ways:



Learn more about the project on the "About the Project" tab below



Take our short survey in the "Survey" tab below by September 30



Sign up for email updates to learn about upcoming engagement opportunities


  • Watch our video

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  • What is a "watershed"?

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    A watershed is an area of land that drains to a body of water that includes streams, lakes, and wetlands. Ultimately, what happens on the land in our watersheds impacts the health and water quality of our waterways.

    As the map below shows, Bellevue is home to four major watersheds that include a diverse variety of fish and other wildlife.


  • Why do we need a Watershed Management Plan?

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    Bellevue has more than 80 miles of streams that are home to salmon and many other types of fish and wildlife.

    Bellevue’s landscape has changed dramatically in the past 150 years, from forests and farmland to a bustling city. Growing our thriving communities has affected the health of our waterways and the fish and wildlife who call them home.

    How do our actions impact our watersheds?

    • More pollution enters our streams from stormwater. Stormwater is rainwater that runs off hard surfaces like rooftops, paved streets, highways, and parking lots. When rain falls over these surfaces, it picks up pollutants like fertilizers, soap, oil, and dirt. This polluted stormwater flows into storm drains and can harm streams, lakes and wetlands.

    • Natural surfaces filter water and help prevent stormwater from entering streams. Too much stormwater running into streams from hard surfaces, even if it’s not carrying pollution, can erode stream banks and harm fish and wildlife habitat.


    What happens in our watersheds impacts the water quality and habitat conditions of Lake Sammamish and Lake Washington, and ultimately, our Puget Sound.

  • What actions will the plan recommend?

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    The Watershed Management Plan will recommend actions for the City to help improve the health of our waterways.

    These types of actions could include:

    • Projects, such as controlling and treating rainwater runoff from city streets before it gets into streams.

    • Programs, like helping people who live near streams to better care for them and removing barriers so fish can move easily through our streams.

    • Policies or regulations, such as incentives for developers or homeowners to build facilities to clean runoff before it gets into streams.

    • Enhanced maintenance, like more street sweeping to prevent pollutants from entering streams.
  • What can you do to help?

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    We need the help of our residents, businesses, and community partners to develop an effective plan that will help us improve our streams now and in the future.

    Here are some of the ways you can get involved over the next year, as the plan is being developed:

Page last updated: 10 August 2021, 13:31