Affordable Housing Strategy

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City council members with golden shovels, breaking ground for new housing.

The city’s Affordable Housing Strategy was adopted in 2017 and sets a goal of creating 2,500 affordable homes over ten years. The Strategy outlines 21 actions the city should take to preserve and increase affordable housing. Action C-1 calls on the city to make it easier to build affordable housing on land owned by public, non-profit housing, and faith-based organizations. This action could result in 200 to 1000 units of affordable housing .

The Bellevue City Council directed staff on July 20th, to draft policy that would provide incentives to build affordable housing on faith-based, housing non-profit, and public owned properties.

As we move forward in crafting this policy, we want to gather input from stakeholders and will provide opportunities for the public to give feedback.

Here's where you can ask a question, leave a comment, and find out more about the process.

The city’s Affordable Housing Strategy was adopted in 2017 and sets a goal of creating 2,500 affordable homes over ten years. The Strategy outlines 21 actions the city should take to preserve and increase affordable housing. Action C-1 calls on the city to make it easier to build affordable housing on land owned by public, non-profit housing, and faith-based organizations. This action could result in 200 to 1000 units of affordable housing .

The Bellevue City Council directed staff on July 20th, to draft policy that would provide incentives to build affordable housing on faith-based, housing non-profit, and public owned properties.

As we move forward in crafting this policy, we want to gather input from stakeholders and will provide opportunities for the public to give feedback.

Here's where you can ask a question, leave a comment, and find out more about the process.

Leave a Comment

Bellevue has a goal of creating 2500 units of affordable housing in the next ten years and we are pursuing multiple strategies to achieve that goal. Right now we are focusing on making it easier to build affordable housing on land owned by non-profit housing and faith-based organizations. We're in the process of drafting a new policy. Here's the place where you can leave a comment or offer feedback for us to consider.

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I am very pleased to see Bellevue making real progress facilitating affordable housing. As we are eager to say - our diversity is our strength - but we have to acknowledge that means socio-economic diversity, age diversity, racial diversity, cultural diversity. The unfettered real estate market place will deny us the very diversity we see as our strength. We need government to help us achieve our already-stated goals.Thank you for this important work.

Chris Marks 28 days ago

Policy and zoning code comments regarding the current Affordable Housing C1 Strategy 2020 Annual Comprehensive Plan Amendment.Thank you for initiating the actions found in Bellevue Affordable Housing Strategy C1, this is a much needed strategy to enable affordable housing development on these underutilized properties. At the time the AHS was adopted, Bellevue’s affordable housing priorities were somewhat aligned with King County’s affordable housing priorities. That alignment appears to have changed in 2020 where King County priorities appear to have diverged from Bellevue’s base priorities behind strategies C1 and E.Up until 2020 King County had been prioritizing capital funding to homeless and very low income projects like 30Bellevue and Andrews Glen. The divergence occurred with new policies released in the King County 2020 Capital Funding for Affordable Housing Projects RFP. The new policies exclude very low income projects like 30Bellevue and Andrews Glen from receiving project based vouchers and will only make project based vouchers available to projects with;“site based Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) serving 35 or more low-income households experiencing chronic homelessness”, and “to serve veterans and their families eligible under the HUD-VASH program and/or non-elderly (age 62 or under at time of leasing) disabled households eligible for support under the Mainstream voucher program.”This new policy almost eliminates all opportunities for very low income projects on faith based properties like 30Bellevue and Andrews Glen. These two projects are considered Permanent Housing with Supports and they are distinctly different from the County’s site based Permanent Supportive Housing priority. The County definitions for the two housing types are;• “Permanent Supportive Housing” (PSH) means non-time limited Affordable Housing for a household that is homeless on entry, and has a condition or disability, such as mental illness, substance abuse, chronic health issues, or other conditions that create multiple and serious ongoing barriers to housing stability.• “Permanent Housing with Supports” (i.e. other permanent housing). Means non-time limited Affordable Housing for households experiencing homelessness with a high to medium level of service needs.The project based voucher funding partnership had been a traditional key component to enable development of affordable housing projects to serve families and senior with very lower income levels. With the loss of leveraging King County funding options for projects similar to 30Bellevue and Andrews Glen on Strategy C1 properties, I recommend the City should also examine how Strategy E can respond to the new County policies.In response to specific zoning code adjustments, I offer the following suggestions for Strategy C1 properties;1. Allow building floor height increase based on building adjacency to arterials and buffer distances adjacent to R-5 zones. a. Instead of allowing height increases based on dimensions, allow height increases based on additional floors. b. Increasingly greater buffers should allow additional floors, i.e. if current code limits a building to 3 floors; - A buffer of “x” width could allow 4 floors - Additional buffer of “y” width in excess of “x” width, where “x+y” width could allow 5 floors. - Where right of ways, easements, at grade setbacks, and upper level setbacks are included in buffer widths.2. On properties where a church and affordable housing are proposed uses, allow residential density based gross tax parcel area(s) without subtracting church floor areas and critical areas in the density calculation.3. Where an affordable housing project encompasses multiple and adjoining church tax parcels, allow increased densities based on gross area of all adjoining church tax parcels.4. Allow all affordable units less than 600sf be considered ½ units.Thank youAllenAllen DautermanSenior Real Estate DeveloperImagine Housing

Allen Dauterman about 1 month ago

I am in complete agreement with the proposed strategy to use an already existing bonus program to encourage the development of affordable housing through partnerships between faith-based/non-profits, City and, potentially, the private sector. The City should also make every effort to streamline the development process to reduce costs in money and time. With the problem so acute the City must act with boldness and speed.

mazzelt 2 months ago

My huge concern revolves around finding affordable housing for those with disabilities. We are currently low income. My son who is intellectually disabled just turned 18. Everyone tells me get on the Section 8 list for my son, but it open just before he turned 18. And even if I filled it out, it is only for one person. My son does not yet have the skills to live completely on his own. So his unit right now is me his guardian and paid care provider and my husband. I had to resign my para-educating career of five years to educate my own child, because the school failed him during closure and in actuality was failing before the closure. So now I am his teacher as well. We cant get our son on SSI until we finish the guardianship process which should conclude the first week in October. My son turned 18 in March and because we are poor I had to do the guardianship all on my own, pro se, Every aspect of my sons life I am trying to navigate at the moment, without losing housing. How we supposed to find low income housing that does not separate us as a family?

mymanyautisticways 2 months ago

In response to "making it easier to build affordable housing on land owned by non-profit housing and faith-based organization" three thoughts.1. Who owns the land should be irrelevant if a recorded long term land use restriction is put in place to limit the use to affordable housing.2. It is critical that any definition of "land owned by non-profit housing" include a tax credit limited partnership that has a general partner or co-general partner that is a non-profit entity. That way a group can take the benefits offered to sites for affordable housing and apply to site a they intend to buy, but may not own until the closing of financing (a step that requires building permits and entitlements).3. THINK BIG. Small changes here will not get you results. Small incremental differentials in density won't do it. Needs to be big.

Emily Thompson 2 months ago